Bali’s Day of Silence and Hindu New Year (Nyepi) in Indonesia ― Date, History, and Details

Bali’s Day of Silence and Hindu New Year (Nyepi) in Indonesia

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History of Bali’s Day of Silence and Hindu New Year (Nyepi) in Indonesia and How to Celebrate/ Observe It

The Day of Silence, or Nyepi, is an important Hindu holiday celebrated in Bali and other parts of Indonesia. It marks the start of the Saka New Year, a lunar calendar based on the Balinese Pawukon system. This annual celebration usually takes place in March or April and involves a day of complete silence and inactivity. On this day, all lights are turned off and people stay indoors, abstaining from any kind of entertainment or pleasure.

Nyepi is a time for self-reflection and meditation, as well as a time to give thanks to the gods. The day before Nyepi is known as “Pengerupukan”, and it is marked by a parade of ogoh-ogoh, which are giant effigies of demons made of bamboo, paper, and cloth. People also make offerings of food, coins, and flowers to appease the evil spirits.

To observe Nyepi, one should avoid leaving the house, working, eating, making noise, or engaging in any kind of entertainment. Instead, one should focus on meditating and reflecting on their life and goals. Additionally, it is customary to light candles and incense to honor the gods. After the day of Nyepi has passed, people then gather together and celebrate with traditional dances, music, and feasting.